5 ways I’m saving the world

Meredith, director of marketing for Urth TV and a living green pioneer, believes that our planet is about to go through a monumental shift.

Toward the positive.

That’s right. Meredith is joyfully optimistic, even in the face of global warming, an oil crisis and dying polar bears, because the way society views environmental problems is finally changing.

“This is a very exciting time in our lives, and it’s going to be up to each individual person to take a look at their life and see how they can contribute to themselves and the community and to the planet,” she said. “Really, the question is, what does it all mean to you?”

In a quest to come up with a concrete definition for green living, Meredith sat down with lots of different magazines and cut out words, images and pictures of what it meant to her to be living green.

“When I started doing the research, I came across lots of pictures of surfing and of water and of healthy food, of wonderful groups of people connected and spending time together,” she said. “That’s my definition of living green, but each individual has to figure out what living green means to them. Everyone has a different piece of the puzzle, because green living is interconnectedness. Every single person’s unique take on green living is what makes our lives possible.”

Meredith’s journey to living green began when she started paying attention to what she was eating. By focusing on what she was putting into her body, she became aware of how she was affecting her environment. She became conscious of how her tube of toothpaste could be causing harm to someone half a world away, and she decided to change the way she lived.

Here are 5 suggestions Meredith has for cultivating consciousness and finding the value in living a greener life:

1. Tap into your body.
Taking care of her body is the first place that ecology started making a difference to Meredith. You can follow suit by using your body more, doing yoga or martial arts. Use your body more and you’ll appreciate its abilities.

2. Be conscious of what you’re eating.

One of the biggest improvements came when Meredith gave up caffeine, and discovered that without it in her system, her feelings of insecurity and butterflies started to dissipate.

“Food became an experience for me because I was sitting quietly with myself every day for a little bit,” she said. “By being with my meal when I was eating it, I literally started to look up out of my skin and think, “Oh my, there’s this whole environment around me.”

3. Pay attention to what is in the products you’re buying.

“In order to feel comfortable in my body, I had to reconsider the products that I used in my home,” she said. “It was just another layer of choosing to take care of myself and surrounding myself with good things.”

4. Look for ways to cut back on consumption.

While recycling is something everyone should be doing, Meredith says reducing the amount of waste you create is even more of a priority.

“It’s not just about buying green labels, but thinking, how many pairs of shoes do I really need? How many times am I really running the washing machine every week? Can I make a gift instead of purchasing one?,” she said.

Take cloth grocery bags, for instance. Before you buy a dozen in your quest to help the environment, think about if you already have bags that will work? Can you find any at a thrift shop or garage sale before you buy a new one? Can you share with a neighbor?

5. Help your fellow humans.

“When I stopped putting so much attention on myself, I started helping other people out,” Meredith said. “I was like, ‘Holy cow. I’m living on this gorgeous, beautiful earth filled with bodies of water that are being polluted, and if I want my children to have a life here and my loved ones to be healthy, I better take care of it.'”

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Secrets for Building an Eco-Friendly Business

Even as a child, Summer was interested in saving the earth.

“Growing up, it was just my mom and me, and she instilled environmental awareness in me,” she said. “Even when I was really young, I’d knock on my neighbors’ doors and tell them to not use so many plastic bags.”

Summer carried her passion for the environment with her through college at UC Berkeley, where she majored in sociology and conservation and resource studies.

After graduation, Summer took a job as a 6th grade teacher. She loved teaching and the lifestyle that it afforded, but soon she found herself going through the motions a little too comfortably.

“I was busy all the time, grading papers constantly at coffee shops, and just living my life,” she said. “But at some point, I realized I had gotten away from those things that had been really important to me.”

As she concentrated her efforts more on reconnecting with her passion, she found she was spending a lot of her free time researching what she bought and what products were good for the earth. Especially when it came to buying clothes, it was difficult to shop responsibly.

“There was nothing I could wear to work. There was nothing I could wear out, going out to clubs or going out to dinner. Frankly, I couldn’t find anything I liked,” she said. “I decided to stop complaining about the fact that nobody had changed this and be the change, create my own resource.”

Summer is passionate about the environment because she cares about what happens in the future.

“Everything that I sell is certified organic, which means a third party comes in and certifies how it’s grown,” she said. “It’s also either domestically made by artisans who create their own wage, under U.S. labor laws, or it’s sourced through the fair trade federations. Every single product has a sort of certification that makes it definitely earth-friendly.”

Being able to help others make better decisions more easily is far more rewarding for Summer than she ever imagined it would be. She feels like she is living a life of purpose, that she is following the admonition on her favorite refrigerator magnet: Be the change you wish to see in the world.

“I feel really happy for what I’ve done,” she said. “I am proud of myself that I’ve really been true to what I believe in but have also made a livelihood in doing that, in doing something small to benefit the bigger picture.”

Check out Summer’s online store BTC Elements, it’s got everything from organic cotton tablecloths to recycled fleece winter coats.

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