This is what cancer looks like

The day Ruth went to the doctor with bronchitis she was a healthy 37-year-old woman who had a bad chest cold. When the nurse came back with the x-ray, she became a woman who was going to have to fight to survive. Ruth listened in disbelief as she was told there was a huge mass on her lungs.

“I walked out of there that day thinking that I had lung cancer, which my grandmother had died of a few years before that, and I knew it was pretty much a six month death sentence. That was a pretty traumatic day.” Just days later she was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.

Ruth had never met anyone who had survived cancer. After some research, she found out there were hundreds of people who survived, but just don’t talk about it. “It felt really important to me that I do something that showed this is not automatically a death sentence,” she said.

One of the most exhausting parts of being diagnosted with cancer is trying to reconcile the visual information, “I am looking in the mirror I am perfectly healthy, I think I am fine and all of a sudden I am being told that I am deathly ill and I am going to lose all my hair and that this chemo that I am going to go through is going to tell the world that I am sick. I am not going to be able to hide it because it does it to you, you don’t have any choice, you lose weight, you turn yellow, you lose all your hair.”

As a photographer, Ruth became armed with a sense of purpose to document the jouney visually, which has admittedly been explored by almost every professional photo journalist– bookstores are filled with all sorts of great photojournalistic essays about people dying from cancer. But that’s just it, Ruth wanted to document the story of someone who had survived.

Two days into the process, Ruth began taking photos.

About four months in, Ruth laid the photos out for her and her students and realized that they told little stories. She put the stories together into groups, picking out groups of three that expressed complete statements. There are 350 total in the collection.

Follow this link to view Unremarkable.

MORE TIPS & TOOLS

Worth a Thousand Words
Get a glimpse at some of the other photographic work Ruth has done in her career at Ruth Adams Photography.

Hodgkin’s? Huh?
Learn more about Hodgkin’s Disease with this detailed guide from the American Cancer Society.

Run for Her Life
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society are racing toward a cure by training people for marathons and triathlons and getting them to spread the message. Take the first step today with Team in Training.